Forgotten your password? 

13 December 2017
Framing the Discourse
The challenges of Research Uptake Part II: Systemic barriers

This is the second in a four-part blog on the challenges faced by practitioners of Research Uptake. In Part I we explored the concept of Research Uptake and how the term had developed over the years. In this second part, we take a closer look at challenges that present themselves at systemic level in the field.

Read more ...
 
The challenges of Research Uptake Part I: Systemic, institutional and individual barriers

This is the first in a four-part blog series on the challenges faced by practitioners of Research Uptake. The first blog looks at the concept of Research Uptake. Where did the term originate and how did it evolve?

Read more ...
 
Defining Research Uptake Management (RUM)

Understanding Research Uptake: Research Uptake is a relatively new and emerging field in which the UK's Department for International Development (DFID) acts as a thought leader and advocate. DRUSSA has developed the concept of Research Uptake Management as a logical and necessary evolution. Working definitions are needed to bound the scope of the field in order to incorporate it as a practical, systematic management function in research institutions.

Read more ...
 
Nelius Boshoff on Research Uptake Management

Research uptake is the process whereby research findings enter the domains of intended but also unintended audiences. It is a complex process as the audiences can be multiple (practitioners, policymakers, scholars, general public, etc.); the notion of “uptake”—which corresponds to “utilisation”—can assume different meanings (being aware of findings, quoting findings, implementing findings, etc.); and a variety of modes exist whereby research can reach user audiences (via publications, brokers, media campaigns, workshops, etc.).

Read more ...
 
Diana Coates on Research Uptake Management

Research Uptake Management (RUM) is a process to systematically manage the research cycle from conception to utilisation with the purpose of getting research findings to the audience(s) for whom they are intended. It is usually research that is intended to have practical application while being underpinned by scientifically validated evidence.

Read more ...
 
1234

Page 4 of 4